NEW JERSEY

Scope and Sequence (Viewing & Media Literacy)

Language Arts

Revised 2002

3.5 (Viewing and Media Literacy)
ALL STUDENTS WILL ACCESS, VIEW, EVALUATE, AND RESPOND TO PRINT, NONPRINT, AND ELECTRONIC TEXTS AND RESOURCES.

A. Constructing Meaning from Media

1. Understand that messages are representations of social reality and vary by historic time periods and parts of the world.

2. Identify and evaluate how a media product expresses the values of the culture that produced it.

3. Identify and select media forms appropriate for the viewer’s purpose.

added 2008:
4 .Examine the commonalities and conflicts between the visual and print messages (e.g., humor, irony, or metaphor) and recognize how words, sounds, and images are used to convey the intended messages.

B. Visual and Verbal Messages
2008 revision:

3.5.12.B.2 Analyze visual techniques used in a media message for a particular audience and evaluate their effectiveness.

3.5.12.B.3 Analyze the effects of media presentations and the techniques to create them.

3.5.12.B.4 Compare and contrast how the techniques of three or more media sources affect the message.

C. Living with Media
1. Evaluate media forms, such as television, video, games, music, and film for content appropriateness (e.g. rating systems, rubric).
2. Choose the most appropriate media for a presentation.

2008 revision:

3.5.12.C.2 Identify and discuss the political, economic, and social influences on news media.

3.5.12.C.3 Identify and critique the forms, techniques (e.g., propaganda) and technologies used in various media messages and performances.

Students learn how to view critically and thoughtfully in order to respond to visual messages and images in print, nonverbal interactions, the arts, and electronic media. Effective viewing is essential to comprehend and respond to personal interactions, live performances, visual arts that involve oral and/or written language, and both print media (graphs, charts, diagrams, illustrations, photographs, and graphic design in books, magazines, and newspapers) and electronic media (television, computers, film). A media-literate person is able to evaluate media for credibility and understands how words, images, and sounds influence the way meanings are conveyed and understood in contemporary society. Students need to recognize that what they speak, hear, write, and read contributes to the content and quality of their viewing.

K-3 strands and indicators

4-8 strands and indicators

Social Studies

Standard 6.1
All students will learn democratic citizenship and how to participate in the constitutional system of government of the US.  Indicator
14: Locate, access, analyze, organize, and apply information about public issues in order to evaluate the validity of different points of view.
This indicator covers what is often called “current events.” Students study
public issues that are currently being discussed in the media.
Standard 6.1  All students will learn democratic citizenship and how to
participate in the constitutional system of government of the US.  Indicator
14: Locate, access, analyze, organize, and apply information about public issues in order to evaluate the validity of different points of view.
This indicator covers what is often called “current events.” Students study
public issues that are currently being discussed in the media.

Health

Standard 2.1

End of 8th grade:

Analyze how family, peers, culture, media, technology, and the environment affect wellness.

Examine health product and food labels and advertisements, comparing accuracy, content, directions, and value.

Analyze the influence of peers and the media on risk behaviors, injuries, and violent behavior.

Standard 2.3 Discuss the influence of the media on the choice, use, and misuse of medicines.

Media & Choices
Standard 2.3-13
See Page 52 for
Sample Learning
Activities

Standard 2.4 Discuss the influence of the media on the development of gender stereotypes.

Analyze sexual messages, images, and stereotypes presented in the media and discuss their impact on sexual behavior.

Copyright 2000 Frank W. Baker

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